Fenili completes School of Police Staff, Command

By on April 4, 2014
Sgt. Gary Fenili & Chief Pat Rollins

Photo: Sugar Grove Police Sergeant Gary Fenili (left) was recognized by the Sugar Grove Village Board on Tuesday for having completed Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command. Fenili is just the second Sugar Grove Police Department supervisor in 22 years to complete the 10-week course. Photos submitted by the Village of Sugar Grove to NJuns@elburnherald.com

SUGAR GROVE—Sergeant Gary Fenili of the Sugar Grove Police Department was honored by Sugar Grove Police Chief Pat Rollins and the Village Board on March 25 for successfully completing Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command.

Fenili completed the grueling 10-week course while fulfilling and attending to his regular job as sergeant. He is just the second Sugar Grove Police Department supervisor in 22 years to complete the course.

Rollins during the ceremony presented a framed certificate along with a key to the school and acknowledged Sgt. Fenili for his achievement.

“Thank you for giving back to the community and for being a leader,” Rollins said.

Fenili expressed his gratefulness for having the opportunity to attend the school.

“I wanted to thank the board for letting me go to the class,” Fenili said. “I look forward to working with the chief on different projects. There is a bright future here at the police force.”

The School of Police Staff and Command is for mid-to-upper-level management personnel. Its students are expected to write lengthy papers and complete extensive projects, presentations, and examinations on topics such as human resources, resource allocation, leadership, budgeting, staffing, employee and union issues, the police end of running a business, and more.

The coursework for the school demands a lot of time and effort on the police officers who attend, as they have to juggle homework, classes, tests, their regular jobs and personal life. The work that accompanies the class is similar to master’s level coursework in a condensed format, according to Rollins.

“I would rate the class as 9.5 to 10 in difficulty,” said Fenili. “There are a lot of late nights with meeting deadlines.”

Upon completing the class, officers may qualify for upper-level positions that are made available.

“I’m very content with my job as a sergeant, but if the opportunity rises to move up, I would throw my hat in the mix,” Fenili said.

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