School Board denies charter school proposal

by Mary Parrilli
KANELAND—The Kaneland School Board on April 8 voted 7-0 to deny the online charter school application proposal that was initially presented at the School Board meeting on March 18.

Kaneland Superintendent Jeff Schuler gave his recommendation on the matter prior to the board’s vote.

“The proposal given by Virtual Learning Solutions fell short on many levels. I would like to inform the board that I never received, from K-12, any answers to our questions until the very last minute, in which they sent me an 1,100 page document,” Schuler said.

He further explained that he read portions of the “unorganized” document and came to the conclusion that it failed the 15 statutory requirements for charter schools, meeting only one requirement: to have the word “charter” in the name of the school.

Schuler said the online charter lacks explanation of admission criteria, evidence of success, evidence of sound economics, and has “many more shortcomings.”

KHS recognizes Students of the Term

KANELAND—The following KHS students were recognized as Students of the Term for Term 3 of the 2012-13 school year: Adam Barnhart, CTE (Business); Jake Helfers, CTE (Orientation to Family Consumer Science); Steven Becker, English; Katie Kenkel, Fine Arts (Music); Sean Flamand, Fine Arts (World Language); Megan Franklin, Math; Alex Olson, Physical Education/Health; Mary Piazza, Science; Erika Carlson, Social Studies; and Danielle Witz, Student Services.

The goal of the Student of the Term program is to recognize KHS students who exemplify the type of effort, commitment, character and leadership qualities and academic effort, including achievement, improvement and contributions, that are desired of all Kaneland students. Recognized students will receive a certificate, T-shirt and plaque.

KCFAF presents to School Board

KANELAND—The Kaneland School Board on April 8 was given a brief presentation on the upcoming Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival by Maria Dripps-Paulson, auditorium manager and executive director of the festival.

“We will be showcasing professional artists, but we also have 614 pieces of student art; eleven of which will be sold in auction,” Dripps-Paulson said.

The festival will take place Sunday, April 21, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

High School students recognized for Land Use Plan participation

Photo: The Kaneland students that helped with the Land Use plan were presented awards and were honored at the village board meeting. Photo by Kimberly Anderson

Students recognized were: Nick Albano, Erika Carlson, Madi Jurcenko, Emily Laudont,
Caitrin Mills, Eric Meuer, Anthony Parillo, Paige Wagner and Kelly Wallner

by Susan O’Neill
ELBURN—Kaneland High School senior Nick Albano is on the varsity baseball team. He’s also an Eagle Scout, a cross country runner on his high school team, a participant in the Model United Nations Club and a member of the National Honor Society.

KHS sophomore Caitrin Mills has always been interested in acting, beginning with middle school plays and musicals. She was chosen to play a part in “Les Miserables,” and was the stage manager for “West Side Story—Kaneland Edition” this year. She is the vice president of the TINA (This Is No Act) improvisation club, and a member of the Scholastical junior varsity team.

What the two students share is a love of Elburn, and a desire to make it even better in the future. Albano and Mills last year joined eight other KHS students in providing input to help revise the Comprehensive Land Use Plan for Elburn.

The classmates on Monday were recognized for their participation by the Elburn Village Board.

Village President Dave Anderson, who introduced the students, said they made him feel good as a member of the Elburn community and as a parent.

“I wish to compliment your instructor in the selection process, because he selected a fine, fine group of students to help this community in planning for your future,” Anderson said.

Social studies teacher Mark Meyer said that Village Administrator Erin Willrett approached him about getting the students involved in the process of determining Elburn’s future. He and several other teachers then helped to identify the students. They chose two students from each class—two freshmen, two sophomores and two juniors. Because the project was to cover about a year, they decided to include only students who would still be at the school the following year.

Meyer said the students had learned in their classes about sustainable development, as well as farm land usage and water sustainability, so they were aware of some of the issues regarding growth.

Mills, who has lived in Elburn 13 of her 16 years, said that there are many things she likes about Elburn, including its small-town feeling.

She likes the fact that people can feel safe walking anywhere in town. She also enjoys the library, where she works part time.

Albano has lived in Elburn since he was born, and his family has been in this area since the early 1900s. He said that although he would like to move somewhere else for a while, he plans on coming back to live in Elburn. Albano said he loves the Metra train, because he can get to downtown Chicago in an hour.

He said he hopes ShoDeen will make the Elburn Station development inviting.

“If it ends up similar to Geneva around the train station, it’ll be really really good for Elburn,” he said.

Albano, Mills, and their classmates Eric Meuer and Jeremy Faletto, during a recent discussion agreed that it would be great to have a place in town where they could hang out, such as a coffee shop or something similar. However, Albano and Meuer said their No. 1 desire was for an amphitheater on the south side of Elburn, where they could go and listen to music.

The students said they would like to see Elburn grow, but they would like to see it expand outward around the downtown area instead of being too spread out.

Meuer said he would like more green space and more trees, especially in the downtown area. Albano agreed, saying he thinks the church parking lot would better serve the village as a park.

Faletto would like a swimming pool in town, and more restaurants that aren’t bars. Meuer said there are already enough banks in Elburn—eight in total. And Albano said a music store would be great, “something to bring people to the downtown area.”

The teens are also in agreement about what they don’t want, namely another Randall Road. They also don’t want Elburn to be like Sugar Grove, which they feel is spread out too much.

The students would prefer to avoid “a lot of town houses and suburban ‘pop-ups,’” and disconnected subdivisions such as Blackberry Creek.

“I’d like to keep the small-town feel, but to add more things to draw people—something that connects the people” Faletto said.

Albano’s mother, Sheila, said that Nick really enjoyed participating in the project. During the meeting with other members of the community, he invited some of his friends to come and give their input.

“A couple adults said they were very impressed with the kids,” Sheila said.

Although the adults and the students had some very different ideas about what they would like to see for Elburn’s future, Sheila said the kids were very respectful of the other community members.

Anderson said that some of the students asked him about why they were chosen to give their input.

“Our plan at that time was 23 years old,” he said. “Twenty-three years from now, guess what? You’re sitting where we (the trustees) are now.”

Anderson said that having the high school students involved was such a success that Images Plus, the consulting firm that created the plan, is encouraging other communities to get their high school students involved.

“Be proud of yourselves, because we’re proud of you,” Anderson said to the students.

Water, sewer rate increases to help update aging systems

by Susan O’Neill
ELBURN—The public is invited, along with village trustees, to take a tour of Elburn’s waste-water treatment plant on Saturday, April 20, at 9 a.m.

A representative from Engineering Enterprises, Inc. will attend the village’s Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday, April 22, to present information about what is needed to update and modify the plant.

Public Works superintendent John Nevenhoven said the plant is vintage 1980s, and trustees will be able to see for themselves “how it operates and how it doesn’t operate.”

Nevenhoven said during budget talks that the village has put off capital improvement projects of the water and sewer systems for so long, that it’s necessary to make that investment now.

One of the big ticket items in next year’s budget is $300,000 for engineering and other start-up work for the waste-water treatment plant modernization project.

“We very much have an ancient system,” Nevenhoven said. “These funds will get us started.”

The board held off on a vote to approve the 2013-14 budget until April 22 due to the absence of trustees Jeff Walter and Ethan Hastert at the Village Board meeting on Monday. The board, however, did approve the water and sewer rate increases that will help to pay for the infrastructure costs.

According to trustee Bill Grabarek, the money from the water and sewer rates charged to the residents goes into something called an “enterprise fund,” which means that the money coming in must cover the cost of providing the services.

Nevenhoven explained that an average customer uses 700 cubic feet, or 5,000 gallons of water per month. This customer would see an increase in their bill of about $6 a month, up from $55 a month to $61.

The new rates will take effect May 1, with the beginning of the new fiscal year.

Junior Lauren Zick placed second in the long jump at the Jill Holmes Invitational Saturday with a leap of 16 feet, 9.5 inches. Photo by Patti Wilk

Big win, small margin

KHS earns slim team win at home meet
by Mike Slodki
KANELAND—There’s nothing like seeing what you’re made of on your home track.

Kaneland girls track has a lot of substance and talent, based on the first-place output at the annual Jill Holmes Invite on Saturday.

The 160.5-point output from the Lady Knights beat Northern Illinois Big XII rival DeKalb by one.

Hononegah, Oswego East and Rosary rounded out the top five with 120.5, 118.5 and 108, respectively.

Rival Sycamore took sixth with 77 points, while Burlington Central was seventh with 63. Familiar foe to the north Belvidere took 11th with 21 points.

Capable senior Ashley Castellanos left the 200 meter dash field in her wake with a first-place finals effort of 27.49 seconds, .2 seconds better than Belvidere’s Kelsey Stone, while junior Lauren Zick’s 59.80 time in the 400m dash earned a first as well.

Junior Sydney Strang took fourth in the 800m run finals with a time of 2:27.75, and teammates Victoria Clinton (5:29.40) and Brianna Bower (5:34.66) acclimated themselves well in the 1600m run, taking second and third, respectively.

Bower came back to finish second in the finals of the 3200m run, thanks to a finish of 11:53.04, while senior Abby Dodis took fourth at 12:41.27.

Lady Knight Amanda Lesak battled through the 300m low hurdles final field to take fourth with an effort of 51.52.

In the 4x100m relay race, Kaneland’s foursome of Kaltrina Ismaili, Allie Heinzer, Olivia Galor and Zick won the field with a time of 51.34 in the finals.

Ismaili, Lesak, Strang and Heinzer managed a fourth for the 4x400m relay finals, thanks to a 4:23.17 time, while Lesak, Jessica Kucera, Clinton and Strang won the 4x800m relay race at 10:17.5

Junior Christina Delach’s second place in the pole vault was due to an effort of eight feet, six inches, while Zick’s 16-9.5 was second in the long jump finals.

Castellanos put in productive field time with a second-place 35-6.25 in the triple jump.

The throwing events were handled quite well by sophomore Elle Tattoni.

The KHS talent took fourth in the shot put at 29-11.25, and claimed the discus mantle at 101-04.

Tattoni was glad to get outdoors for track competition and is seeing what works with plenty of time left in the season.

“I was a little shaky on that first Tuesday meet,” Tattoni said. “Now it’s early in the season and the weather’s warming up, so we should be good. I’m seeing what works and trying some new things.”

The Lady Knights also did battle with host Sycamore on Tuesday and returned home on the wrong end of a 73-63 result.

The Lady Knights head to Ottawa for the ABC Invitational on Friday, April 12, followed by Jenni’s ABC Meet on Saturday, April 13, in Maple Park.

Casey Crosby fires a pitch from the mound in 2012 action as a member of the Toledo Mud Hens. 					     Photo courtesy of Toledo Mud Hens

Ready for more

Photo: Casey Crosby fires a pitch from the mound in 2012 action as a member of the Toledo Mud Hens. Photo courtesy of Toledo Mud Hens

First big-league start whets Crosby’s appetite
by Mike Sandrolini
ELBURN—Casey Crosby certainly didn’t mind an unexpected change of plans late last May that got him to “The Show,” aka, the Major Leagues.

The former Kaneland High School star, drafted by the Detroit Tigers in 2007, was to make a scheduled start for the club’s Class AAA affiliate Toledo Mud Hens in Scranton, Pa., on a Thursday night, May 31, 2012, against the Yankees’ farm team, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders.

Crosby would then travel back to Toledo after the game on the team bus overnight and meet his wife, Haley, who was driving up from Elburn, so the couple could spend some time together since the Mud Hens had a home stand that weekend.

But that was all before Mud Hens’ manager Phil Nevin paid Crosby a visit on Wednesday. Nevin informed him that his start was being pushed back to Friday, June 1. Crosby instead would be heading north to Detroit to take the place of the injured Doug Fister in the Tigers’ rotation, and thus, be making his first Major League start.

“It was a dream come true,” said Crosby, rated the Tigers’ No. 8 prospect after the 2012 season by Baseball America. “It’s something I’ve wanted to do (since I was a kid) ever since I could talk, really. My hair stood up and heart started racing nonstop after that.”

After getting the good news, he called Haley in Elburn, where the couple makes their home, but downplayed the change of plans.

“I played it off as not a big deal,” he said, “kind of joking with her that my start was being moved back to Friday because throwing against the New York Yankees was better than throwing against Scranton.”

Crosby’s mound opponent for his first big-league start was none other than C.C. Sabathia. However, Crosby said he didn’t allow the fact that he was facing one of baseball’s premier pitchers to affect his mindset before the game.

“If you treat the game bigger than it actually is, you’re going to get eaten up,” said Crosby, who interestingly was called C.C. by his youth travel team teammates because he, like Sabathia, is left-handed and his initials are C.C. “You’re already amped up because you’re there, but you want to calm yourself down. It’s the same game you’ve played as a kid. Since I was a little kid I watched him (Sabathia) pitch.”

Nonetheless, Crosby said it was quite an experience to step onto the field at Comerica Park for his first start in front of over 41,000 fans.

“Going into the stadium onto the field, just taking it in size of stadium, the cameras, it was such an uplifting feeling to know that you made it,” he said, “and doing something that pretty much not every kid can experience when they‘re older.”

Sabathia and the Yanks unfortunately got the better of Crosby and the Tigers that night, beating Detroit, 9-4. However, Crosby was back on the bump June 7, and did pick up his first Major League victory after the Tigers edged Cleveland, 7-5. He gave up three earned runs and five hits in 5 1/3 innings.

“It was great,” Crosby said regarding getting the “W.” “Everything from seeing the last out made to getting the game ball to getting a beer shower, it was an amazing day.”

Fister returned from the disabled list in mid-June, so Crosby went back to Toledo to finish out the season. He was 7-9 with Toledo last year, with a 4.01 ERA, giving up 112 hits in 125 2/3 innings while striking out 112.

Crosby is on the Tigers’ 40-man roster and spent spring training at the team’s facility in Lakeland, Fla. He pitched a total of seven innings. That might not seem like a lot to the casual baseball observer, but Crosby explained there were only so many innings to go around, given the sheer number of pitchers in camp.

“There’s so many guys in spring training that everyone needs to get their reps in,” he said. “It’s hard (to get more innings). Most of guys were around seven innings. They’ve got some solid veteran pitchers.”

Crosby pitched two innings during his final spring outing with the Tigers, giving up one hit and no earned runs vs. the New York Mets. Although Crosby was optioned to Toledo in mid-March shortly after facing the Mets, Tigers’ manager Jim Leyland said he liked what he saw from the 24-year- old.

“He started to pitch with a little more confidence in his control,” Leyland told the Detroit Free Press. “Also had a pretty good curveball, so he’s a guy we want down there stretched out. He got his feet wet a little bit last year, got a little bit of an idea what it’s about up here. That’s a good thing.”

“They just said that I showed a lot of improvement from last spring training,” Crosby said of his conversations with those in the Detroit organization prior to him going back to Toledo. “Even though I’m getting sent down doesn’t mean it’s not going to happen, that (I won’t) get back into the big leagues. If I’m a guy who’s doing well down here, I’ll get the call (back up), but I just have to keep plugging away and working.”

Crosby’s curveball was rated the best in the Tigers’ farm system by Baseball America after the 2012 season, but he also possesses a fastball that’s clocked in the mid-90s.

“The main thing they told me is keep throwing strikes and not holding back with my fastball,” Crosby said. “Let it go and throw strikes with it.”

Crosby said he’ll be on a pitch count (80 to 90 pitches per start) in Toledo until late April.

“They still project me as a starter,” he said. “Hopefully I’ll be able to spot start a game or two (this year in Detroit).”

Softball returns to regular action

Following weather delays and road trip, KHS finds consistency
by Mike Slodki
KANELAND—It was good to finally take to the softball diamond on Illinois soil. The experience on Thursday was made even better with a handy win. With Ellissa Eckert’s effort on the mound and key hitting in scoring position, the Lady Knights beat the host Rochelle roster by a 10-4 final on Thursday.

In Rochelle, things escalated quickly for the Kaneland bats, as two of the first three hitters reached on errors. With two runners in scoring position, Lanie Callaghan knocked a single for a 1-0 lead. Two batters later, Sarah Grams hit a single for two more runs and a 3-0 lead.

In the top of the third and with a 3-1 lead, Haley Contorno was hit by a pitch and came home on an RBI triple from Grams. Eckert then helped her own cause with a squeeze play that ended in a run scored and a 5-1 edge.

In the top of the fifth and with Rochelle closing to within 5-2, Callaghan tripled and Meg Cohrs walked. After a stolen base put runners in scoring position, Grams’ single resulted in her fourth RBI of the day. After a grounder to third by Eckert, the lead increased to 7-1 in the fifth.

A steadfast hitter, Grams was just glad to contribute to the offensive effort on the day.

“I was just happy I put the ball in play and on the ground so my runners could actually score,” Grams said. “That was my main concern, just putting it in play so I could get runners in.”

Paige Kuefler’s RBI double and an RBI single by Cohrs gave Kaneland a 10-2 lead in the sixth to cinch matters.

KHS coach Brian Willis said that any quality at-bat helps the squad after a start-and-stop beginning to 2013.

“Certainly Sarah was seeing the ball well,” Willis said. “I thought we struggled a little bit with our timing today. We did have a few good quality at-bats and that helped us at the right time.”

Against former conference rival Batavia, Kaneland scored 11 runs in the first inning, three more in the second, one in the third and two in the fourth. Eckert improved to 4-0 on the season.

West Aurora failed to hit Lady Knight sophomore Anissa Becker on Monday, and fell in the 1-0 squeaker.

Against Yorkville on Tuesday, the Lady Knights held a 3-1 lead until the top of the seventh, when Yorkville put up three runs to take the lead and steal the victory. KHS suffered from seven errors in the game.

Eckert took the loss on the mound, spreading eight hits over seven innings of work, and surrendering just two unearned runs. Allyson O’Herron led the team from the plate, hitting 2-for-4 with an RBI.

Kaneland now stands at 7-2 overall, 1-1 in Northern Illinois Big XII East Division play.

Future action for KHS has the Lady Knights traveling to Morris for a conference tilt on Thursday, April 11, at 4:30 p.m.

#10 gets hit

See-saw start to season

[button color=”blue” link=”http://elburnherald.com/29041/2013/04/18/photos-kaneland-vs-sterling-april-9/2/”]View Photos[/button]

After rough start, Knights baseball wins 4 of last 5
by Mike Slodki
KANELAND—It’s a case of slowly but surely for the boys in black.

After dropping its first five games of the year in Cardinals territory, the KHS baseball lineup may find its footing just yet.

The Knights won four of their last five, with a win over Plano on April 3 preceding a loss on Thursday in Rockton, Ill., against Hononegah. They added a Northern Illinois Big XII crossover win in Maple Park against Sterling and came through in a 6-4 win over Rochelle at home on Tuesday.

Following Tuesday’s win, KHS sits at 4-6 in the still-young season.

In the 6-5 win over Interstate Eight Conference mainstay Plano, it was a six-run fifth that did the trick for the Knights. The flurry was enough to withstand the five-run rally by the Reapers squad in the top of the seventh.

Josh Cohrs had a double, while Dan Miller and Matt Limbrunner had two RBI each.

Freshman callup Anthony Holubecki took the win, while Nick Stahl shut the seventh down for the save.

In the loss against NIC-10 school Hononegah, the Knight nine dropped a 4-0 result, as they managed just two hits on the afternoon, accomplished by Miller and Lane Davis.

Limbrunner was tagged with the loss on the mound.

In windswept conditions on Saturday, the Knights’ 1-0 win over the Golden Warriors was buoyed by just one hit, a Cohrs RBI double in the first inning, to win the affair.

Curtis Thorson powered through on the hill to earn the victory.

“(Sterling’s) always a very aggressive and competitive team,” KHS coach Brian Aversa said. “That win showed us a lot again. We still are figuring out a lineup, we got an incredible performance from Curtis Thorson that solidified our belief in his ability, and we proved that we are capable of winning the tight games and playing good defense when it counts.”

Holubecki came on in relief on Tuesday and notched another win, shutting down Rochelle in his two innings pitched, collecting a walk and a strikeout as well.

The Knights ran out to a 3-0 lead after two, before Rochelle battled back with two runs in each of the third and fourth innings. A three-RBI sixth inning gave Kaneland the winning edge.

Miller led the Kaneland hitters with a 2-for-3 day, with a run, RBI an a walk. John Hopkins also went 2-for-3, and Martinelli went 1-for-3, with two runs and a stolen base.

Kaneland concludes its series with NIB12 rival Rochelle in Ogle County on Wednesday and Thursday, April 10 and 11. Wednesday’s result was not available as of press time.

 

A week of firsts

Kaneland soccer scores first goal, earns first win of season
by Mike Slodki
Kaneland—By the looks of it, the Kaneland Lady Knights will play teams quite tough in 2013.

The only question is whether or not wins will come as frequent as they’d like considering the heightened competition.

Coming in to the West Aurora Blackhawk Invite with just one previous match under the jersey, Kaneland took to the Aurora field on Thursday and lost to the hosts 1-0, and followed through with a Saturday 1-1 tie against perennial area contender Rosary.

Kaneland sits at 1-2-1 (1-1 Northern Illinois Big XII) in the early juncture of the 2013 campaign.

“We are a very young team and sometimes it takes a while to gel,” KHS coach Scott Parillo said. “We are getting better every day and hopefully we click soon. We have played some pretty decent teams to start the season and that will only help. We really need to shoot more.”

For KHS against the Lady Blackhawks, it was a second-half goal that did the Lady Knights in to open the invite.

Against the Royals, who had previously eliminated the Lady Knights in their 2010 and 2011 regional title matches, the blustery conditions limited successful scoring outputs. However, Kaneland powered through and earned its first score of the season thanks to a Kiandra Powell goal on a feed from returnee Jess Coia in the first half.

Rosary was able to tie the tussle with a second-half goal.

The Lady Knights group was able to fit in its second NIB12 Conference clash at Morris on Tuesday. Brittany Olson provided the only scoring for both teams, giving Kaneland the lead in the first half and adding to it in the second.

Ahead for the Lady Knights is a Thursday, April 11, battle with visiting Rochelle.

Elsie Ottens

Elsie Ottens, 91, of Aurora, passed away suddenly, following a brief illness, in the early morning hours of Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at Provena Mercy Center Hospital in Aurora. She is now free to live eternally in Heaven.

She was born Feb. 8, 1922, in Bairdford, Penn., the daughter of Clark and Barbara Greene.

Elsie’s family moved to Mooseheart in Batavia following her father’s passing before her second birthday. When her mother married Jay Moulding in 1933, Elsie and the rest of the children moved back with her, making their home on a farm in the Elburn area.

She was united in marriage on June 7, 1947, to Harry Joseph Ottens at the First Presbyterian Church in Aurora. They began their life on Watson Street in Aurora and made thousands of memories in the town that would be her lifelong home.

Elsie worked at Allsteel for more than 50 years. She retired after they closed their doors in 1994. Elsie would carry the burden of grief twice in her life with the loss of Harry in 1979, and her son Kevin in 1995.

Elsie was a former member of the Loyal Order of the Moose, Post 100 and First Presbyterian Church in Aurora.

Elsie’s hands were immensely talented and always moving. She enjoyed many kinds of crafts and always loved to share her handiwork with family and friends. She even taught as a Tri-Chem instructor on how to use a special paint made especially for craftwork. She also had a mind for details and was deft at putting together puzzles. The end results were many times immortalized by sealing them forever and displaying their beauty on the walls of her home.

She is survived by one sister, Ann I. Lambert of Lily Lake; many nieces and nephews and a community of friends.

She is preceded in death by her parents, Clark Greene and Barbara Moulding; her husband, Harry; only son, Kevin Ottens; three brothers, Clyde “Norman” Greene, Clark Greene and Wilbur Peterman; and one sister, Pearl McCann.

Visitation was held on Friday at Conley Funeral Home. A funeral service to celebrate her life followed visitation, with interment at Blackberry Township Cemetery in Elburn.

In lieu of flowers, a memorial has been established in her name to benefit her favorite charities. Memorials may be made to the “Elsie Ottens Memorial” and mailed in care of P.O. Box 66, Elburn, IL 60119. Tributes may be forwarded to the same address or at www.conleycare.com.

KC Health Dept. officially files for accreditation

ILLINOIS—With the help of Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck and Kane County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen, the Kane County Health Department officially submitted its documentation needed for national accreditation during a recent ceremony.

The documents were sent to the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) during the last day of National Public Health Week.

“To be accredited would place us among the best local health departments in the nation and is another example of our commitment to achieve our vision of having the healthiest residents in Illinois by 2030,” Kane County Health Department Executive Director Barbara Jeffers said.

“Accreditation is the wave of the future in public health, and we are encouraging all departments to become accredited,” Hasbrouck said.

“Our job is to provide the best possible services to our residents for the lowest possible cost, and to have our health department accredited is another example of our commitment to meet that responsibility,” Lauzen said.

Filing for accreditation is just the first step. Next, PHAB must review the submitted documents (329 of them covering 12 separate domains, or categories), a process which can take several weeks. PHAB then schedules a two-day site visit, where staff members who worked on the different domains, as well as stakeholders and partners, are interviewed. The final decision will be made after the PHAB Accreditation Committee reviews the site visit report.

Accreditation through PHAB provides a means for a department to identify performance improvement opportunities, to improve management, develop leadership, and improve relationships with the community. The process is one that challenges the health department to think about what business it does and how it does that business. It encourages and stimulates quality and performance improvement as well as greater accountability and transparency.

Each year the first week of April is celebrated as National Public Health Week. This year’s theme is “Public Health is ROI: Save Lives, Save Money.” The 2013 NPHW theme was developed to highlight the value of prevention and the importance of well-supported public health systems in preventing disease, saving lives and curbing health care spending.

HMS Mattina Brass Ensemble performs the Star Spangled Banner at football game

SCHAUMBURG, ILL.—Kaneland Harter Middle School‘s Mattina Brass Ensemble on March 17 performed The Star Spangled Banner during the opening ceremony of the Chicago Slaughter’s football game. The event took place at the Sears Centre in Schaumburg, alongside a military color guard, athletes, cheerleading squads, and the Chicago Highlanders (a bagpipe and drum group).

The ensemble also met and took a photo with the Slaughter coach and former Chicago Bears defensive tackle Steve McMichael, who helped the team win Super Bowl XX in January 1986.

Prior to the game, a linebacker from the opposing team also posed for a quick photo. Turns out he was a baritone player in his school band.

Mattina will perform the National Anthem at the Kane County Cougars baseball game on Thursday, June 13. The ensemble members continue to enjoy honoring our country through these performance opportunities.

Editorial: The results are in

… And just like that, 2013 Consolidated Election season is over. Kaput. Finito.

Tuesday’s election festivities resulted in some familiar officials staying put in their current position, as well as some new faces hitting the local government scene via big wins at the polls. Here’s what we know:

• A highly competitive, combative village president race in Sugar Grove resulted in incumbent Sean Michels retaining his seat for another four years. Michels, defeated village trustee Kevin Geary by collecting 55.72 percent of the vote.
• Tom Rowe is the new Sugar Grove Township supervisor, thanks to an election performance in which he carried over 44 percent of the vote in a four-man race.
• The Sugar Grove Village Board retained two trustees in Rick Montalto and Robert Bohler, and added a new one in Sean Herron, who outlasted trustee hopefuls Gayle Deja-Schultz and Stephanie Landorf.
• Elburn, too, retained two of its village trustees—Kenneth Anderson Jr. and Jeffrey Walter—and added village plan commissioner Pat Schuberg. Be sure to check out reporter Elburn Herald reporter Susan O’Neill’s write-up of Schuberg on page 1A of this week’s issue.
• Patricia Hill is Kaneville’s next village president, as she edged Rick Peck by just three votes on Tuesday evening. Peck served as interim village president following the passing of Bob Rodney in July 2012.
• Maple Park will have a newcomer on its Village Board, as Lucas Goucher was one of three candidates elected to a four-term position on Tuesday evening. Greg Cutsinger and Terry Borg were also elected to four-year seats in Maple Park.

Commentary follows election
aftermath in Sugar Grove
Michels said he’s excited for the opportunity to serve four more years as Sugar Grove village president.

“It was great to have the support of the rest of the board, and we worked together,” he said. “I think people are tired of the negativity and the complaining. The residents have said that things are progressing in Sugar Grove. We’ve accomplished a lot, and we have a lot more to accomplish as we move forward. I am looking forward to the opportunity. I think my opponent has some fence-mending to do.”

Geary on Tuesday night was gracious in defeat, and noted that he still has two years left in his current term—time that he plans to spend representing Sugar Grove and “being their champion for issues and concerns.”

“A lot of things have been said throughout this campaign, but we’re all Sugar Grove residents, and we need to pull together and make this the world-class community that we desire to make it,” Geary said.

Rowe makes it count
with election night win
What can $600 get you these days? If you’re Tom Rowe, plenty.

That’s the total Rowe spent on his grassroots campaign for Sugar Grove Township supervisor, and it will go down as the best $600 he’s ever spent. Rowe came out way ahead of his three opponents in Tuesday night’s election.

“It’s a big relief (to win the election). I really didn’t know it would come out this way,” Rowe said. “I thought I had a good campaign, and the race was mostly clean and positive. The voters have spoken, and I look forward to beginning a new chapter for Sugar Grove Township.”

On Tuesday morning, it was discovered that someone had tried to burn one of Rowe’s campaign signs.

Anderson, Walter thankful for re-election
Elburn trustee re-elect Kennth Anderson said he’s thankful and blessed to have the support of the residents of the village of Elburn.

“It has been a pleasure to have represented them for the past four years, (and) I look forward to representing them for four more.”

Walter said public service is truly a calling, and even just running takes a huge commitment to your community.

“Elburn is in an incredible position for future growth that needs to be managed properly,” he said. “My commitment to the village is to continue to be the voice of my constituents in managing the village with a sense of fiscal responsibility and an eye toward smart growth.”

Of course, these election results were made possible by residents getting out and hitting the polls. We applaud everyone who made the effort to ensure that their voice was heard this election season, and we hope voter turnout will be even greater next time around.

Until then, farewell 2013 Consolidated Election season. Though our time together was brief, we absolutely enjoyed every second of it.

SG resident granted ownership of property, right-of-way

by Dave Woehrle
SUGAR GROVE—Sugar Grove Village Board members on April 2 voted to allow resident Warren Hestekin to take ownership of property on the east side dead end of Calkins Drive.

The village will also vacate the right-of-way at the end of East Calkins Drive, where Hestekin currently resides.

Hestekin made the proposal to the Village Board at its Feb. 26 meeting. Director of Public Works Tony Speciale and Streets and Properties Supervisor Geoff Payton submitted the official recommendation on April 2.

Hestekin will purchase the vacated property for $10 and take responsibility for maintenance. He has stated he would like to improve the area by adding trees and a sidewalk.

According to the deal, the village maintains the right to re-aquire the property from Hestekin at no cost should it be deemed necessary. A blanket utility easement would also be maintained by the village. No structures of any kind are allowed, and any improvement made to the land shall not interfere with snow and ice removal.

Sugar Grove expects the costs of the project will be $250 for legal and engineering reviews.

A sale for all

Laura & Owen Herra checking out trucks

Laura Molitor & Daughter Alyssa helping

Linn Garon of MP shopping the racks

Owen Herra checking out toys
A spring clothing and toy sale on Friday and Saturday at Kaneland John Stewart Elementary School in Elburn. Laura and Owen Herra searched through the sale of gently-used spring and summer clothing, shoes, toys, games, puzzles, books, videos, DVDs, room decor, jewelry and sports equipment.
Photos by Kimberly Anderson

The exciting 2013 Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival

by Maria Dripps-Paulson
Executive director, Kaneland Fine Arts Festival

The Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival (KCFAF) promises to be an amazing celebration of the arts, with more than 30 professional visual and performing artists showcased, as well as over 500 student art pieces displayed and an art auction of student and professional
work.

On Sunday, April 21, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Kaneland High School will open its doors to over 3,000 guests who will experience the arts in the Kaneland School District’s hands-on, intergenerational and award-winning Fine Arts Festival event. This year’s roster of artists will delight the eye and feed the soul with their visual beauty and auditory splendor.

The 2013 Visual Artist Roster for the festival is an outstanding list of talented individuals.

Lars-Birger Sponberg immigrated to the United States in 1930, and his oil paintings hang in two
U.S. embassies, as well as several galleries in the Midwest. Carol and Mark Pflughoeft travel to the festival from Iowa to present their work in acrylic and digital art. Local artist Sue Norris, brings her uniquely made pottery from Sugar Grove.

This year, with a grant from the Kaneland Foundation, the KCFAF was pleased to bring an artist into the schools throughout the district to partner with Kaneland art teachers and art students. The innaugural KCFAF Artist in Residence program is pleased to have Eric Nye, photographer and painter from Chicago, bring his creative 3D work to the festival.

KCFAF Artist in Residence art projects will be on display. Glass fusing and caricature drawing will again return as workshops for the festival.

New to this year’s list of workshops is silhouette artist Rachel Schwartz and author/illustrator Sallie Wolf. Schwartz will cut silhouettes of festival guests throughout the day, and Wolf will hold a writing workshop from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre.

Performing artists attending the festival will provide opportunities for all ages to experience

a variety of mediums. The Common Taters is a square dance band who will call dances beginning at 3:30 p.m. in the KHS commons.

Fans of the Chicago Cubs will want to attend the festival at 11 a.m. to hear the Chicago Cubs Dixieland Band delight audiences as they do at Cubs games. M & M Dance Company from Elburn will perform in the auditorium, as well as the Waubonsee Community College Steel Band and Bel Canto, the select choir from McDole Elementary.

Children who are not yet in school can experience Kaneland District Library Storytime at the festival, held at the top of every hour in the Pre-K Art Experience rooms of the Fox Valley Career Center.

The Sugar Grove Public Library will register library cards and check out books in the auditorium lobby. Student groups, such as the Art and Science Club, will provide facepainting, balloon artistry, and homemade instruments made from recycled material.

So much more makes up the festival day, and information can be found on www.kanelandartsfestival.org or www.facebook.com/kcfaf302.

Editor’s note
The above community-submitted column is one part of our broader mission to help our readers connect with their communities. If you or your organization would like to be part of our Community Corner initiative, please contact Editor Keith Beebe at kbeebe@elburnherald.com. Please note that no for-profit or elected officials are eligible to be part of the Community Corner.

East Moline momentum

First-ever win at traditional outdoor opener for boys track
By Mike Slodki
Kaneland—For the talent pool near the Quad Cities, to take the unofficial opener of the 2013 outdoor season is a big deal for the Knights track roster.

The 12-team gathering saw Kaneland score 260 team points on Saturday in the UTHS Boys Kiwanis Invitational, hosted by East Moline United.

The hosts were second overall with a total of 220.5, and Northern Illinois Big XII crossover foe Geneseo was third overall with 204 points.

Rock Island (184), Iowa’s Pleasant Valley (169) and T.F. South (135) rounded out the top half of the standings. Sterling, with 88 points, took ninth.

The meet was structured in flights of “A,” “B” and “C,” and had Kaneland running to daylight in plenty of events.

John Meisinger’s 3200 meter run “B” resulted in a second-place effort (10:41.54), while the “B” 4x800m relay team for Kaneland took second with a time of 8:59.28.

Kaneland’s 4x100m “B” team won the event with a time of 45.83 seconds, while the “A” foursome of Brandon Bishop, Brandon Cottier, Dylan Nauert and Ben Barnes won its challenge with a time of 43.85.

Nauert struck again in the “A” 110m hurdles event that saw him nab second with a time of 16:07, while Stephen McCracken of Kaneland managed a second in the “C” running of the 800m run (2:09.41).

In the 800m run “A” battle, reliable Knight Conor Johnson won the event with a time of 2:02.58, while the 4x200m relay “B” crew took first with a time of 1:38.83.

Kaneland’s 4x200m relay group of Bishop, Barnes, Dylan Pennington and Cottier took second in the “A” group with a time of 1:32.67.

Knight speedster Kyle Carter worked through the 400m dash “B” flight for a win in 51.28, while “A” counterpart Nathaniel Kucera won his race with a time of 51.05.

Kaneland made more of a hurdle presence in the 300m hurdles “B,” thanks to Brock Robertson’s second at 42.71 and Nauert’s “A” first-place at 40.68.

The field events saw a nice dose of Kaneland power, especially in the shot put, with “B” champ Shane Jorgensen’s 47 feet, 7.5 inches, and “A” king Nate Dyer’s 52-04.

The pole vault saw “C” glory thanks to JR Vest’s first (12-06), Kory Harner’s second in “B” (11-06) and Dylan Kuipers’ “A” reign (13 feet).

Considering the opposing talent level and the mix of experienced and new, KHS coach Eric Baron feels it was a job well done out west.

“They did fine, they had lots of excitement about this first meet,” Baron said. “They really performed well. It was the first time we won this meet and that is saying a lot considering the legendary track programs we competed against.”

Kaneland also had a dual meet at Sycamore on Tuesday and dominated Sycamore and Hiawatha. Kaneland tallied 111 points, well out in front of Sycamore’s 34 and Hiawatha’s 1.

The Knight crew heads to the Ottawa Invitational set for Saturday, April 13.

Elburn Village Board approves Land Use Plan

by Susan O’Neill
ELBURN—The Elburn Village Board at its April 1 meeting approved the village’s Comprehensive Land Use Plan, a project approximately one year in the making.

The project was completed with the assistance of the consulting firm Images, Inc., and with input of a variety of individuals, business and community groups, students and community members, in addition to Village Board members.

The plan maps out the village’s future for the next 20-plus years, updating the previous version, which was completed 23 years ago. The plan covers territory within 1.5 miles of the boundaries of the village, and lays out areas for residential, commercial, industrial and mixed-use development, as well as where land will be set aside as open space.

The total population at build-out, including the long-term expansion of the area, is projected at 41,737. The current population of the village is 5,602.

The project was funded through a grant from the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), the regional planning organization for the counties of northeastern Illinois.

Calling it a step in the right direction, Village President Dave Anderson thanked Carrie Hansen of Images, Inc. for her time and effort, and CMAP for the funding that made the project possible.

“We just updated a 23-year-old document,” Village Administrator Erin Willrett said. “That’s huge.”

Pint-sized bar opens

Paisano’s owners to open Eddie Gaedel Pub and Grill in Elburn
by Elizabeth Rago
ELBURN—Small-business owners Annette and Dick Theobald are tentatively scheduled to open the Eddie Gaedel Pub and Grill, located at 117 North Main St. in Elburn, in May. The couple are Kaneville residents who have teamed up with Rob and Myra Ottoson to purchase the Main Street property.

Annette and Dick are not newcomers to the restaurant business. In 2003, they opened Paisano’s Pizza and Grill, which sits across the street from the couple’s new eatery.

“At the time we opened Paisano’s, Jim and Rita Cotti opened their bar (at 117 North Main St.) and we were able to have our pizza menu on their tables,” Annette said. “The Cottis became one of our top customers. By purchasing the bar, we are able to offer our customers a place to have a pizza and a cold beverage.”

The Theobalds purchased the pub location from Jim Cotti, but state they were not originally looking to buy a bar.

Instrumental in the design and renovation of Eddie Gaedel Pub and Grill, the Ottosons and local tradesmen have been busy completing the punch list of changes to transform the restaurant’s interior and exterior.

“By renovating the bar, we hope to improve the historic section of downtown Elburn,” Annette said. “We feel we will only complement a night out on the town in downtown Elburn, which will bring more people more often to downtown.”

Besides pizza from the Paisano’s menu, Eddie Gaedel’s will serve burgers, paninis, mini-sandwiches such as pulled pork and roast beef, paired with salads, soup and appetizers. The bar will stock beverages like craft beers, wine, martinis and frozen drinks.

With their reputation for service, food and a vested interest in the Kaneland community, the Theobalds look forward to catering to existing customers, and hope to draw new patrons with the option to relax, have a meal and watch their favorite sports team.

Since Paisano’s has been widely supported by the community, Annette and Dick felt it only natural to anchor their efforts locally by rallying behind area businesses to provide free advertising on Paisano’s pizza boxes, sponsoring local sports teams and donating gift certificates to area fundraisers, to name a few.

So, how will Eddie Gaedel give back?

“That’s a good question,” Annette said. “We will sponsor adult softball teams and be on the lookout for organizations to donate gift certificates to. We are in the process of exploring other ways to give back to the community.”

To follow along with the renovation and launch of Eddie Gaedel Pub and Grill, visit www.facebook.com/#!/EddieGaedelPubandGrill.

The Theobalds are happily accepting applications for experienced and certified cooks and bartenders. Interested persons can fill out an application at Paisano’s, 106 N. Main St. in Elburn, or send a direct message on Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/EddieGaedelPuband Grill.

Editorial: The results are in

… And just like that, 2013 Consolidated Election season is over. Kaput. Finito.
Tuesday’s election festivities resulted in some familiar officials staying put in their current position, as well as some new faces hitting the local government scene via big wins at the polls. Here’s what we know:
• A highly competitive, combative village president race in Sugar Grove resulted in incumbent Sean Michels retaining his seat for another four years. Michels, defeated village trustee Kevin Geary by collecting 55.72 percent of the vote.
• Tom Rowe is the new Sugar Grove Township supervisor, thanks to an election performance in which he carried over 44 percent of the vote in a four-man race.
• The Sugar Grove Village Board retained two trustees in Rick Montalto and Robert Bohler, and added a new one in Sean Herron, who outlasted trustee hopefuls Gayle Deja-Schultz and Stephanie Landorf.
• Elburn, too, retained two of its village trustees—Kenneth Anderson Jr. and Jeffrey Walter—and added village plan commissioner Pat Schuberg. Be sure to check out reporter Elburn Herald reporter Susan O’Neill’s write-up of Schuberg on page 1A of this week’s issue.
• Patricia Hill is Kaneville’s next village president, as she edged Rick Peck by just three votes on Tuesday evening. Peck served as interim village president following the passing of Bob Rodney in July 2012.
• Maple Park will have a newcomer on its Village Board, as Lucas Goucher was one of three candidates elected to a four-term position on Tuesday evening. Greg Cutsinger and Terry Borg were also elected to four-year seats in Maple Park.

Commentary follows election
aftermath in Sugar Grove
Michels said he’s excited for the opportunity to serve four more years as Sugar Grove village president.
“It was great to have the support of the rest of the board, and we worked together,” he said. “I think people are tired of the negativity and the complaining. The residents have said that things are progressing in Sugar Grove. We’ve accomplished a lot, and we have a lot more to accomplish as we move forward. I am looking forward to the opportunity. I think my opponent has some fence-mending to do.”
Geary on Tuesday night was gracious in defeat, and noted that he still has two years left in his current term—time that he plans to spend representing Sugar Grove and “being their champion for issues and concerns.”
“A lot of things have been said throughout this campaign, but we’re all Sugar Grove residents, and we need to pull together and make this the world-class community that we desire to make it,” Geary said.

Rowe makes it count
with election night win

What can $600 get you these days? If you’re Tom Rowe, plenty.
That’s the total Rowe spent on his grassroots campaign for Sugar Grove Township supervisor, and it will go down as the best $600 he’s ever spent. Rowe came out way ahead of his three opponents in Tuesday night’s election.
“It’s a big relief (to win the election). I really didn’t know it would come out this way,” Rowe said. “I thought I had a good campaign, and the race was mostly clean and positive. The voters have spoken, and I look forward to beginning a new chapter for Sugar Grove Township.”
On Tuesday morning, it was discovered that someone had tried to burn one of Rowe’s campaign signs.

Anderson, Walter thankful for re-election
Elburn trustee re-elect Kennth Anderson said he’s thankful and blessed to have the support of the residents of the village of Elburn.
“It has been a pleasure to have represented them for the past four years, (and) I look forward to representing them for four more.”
Walter said public service is truly a calling, and even just running takes a huge commitment to your community.
“Elburn is in an incredible position for future growth that needs to be managed properly,” he said. “My commitment to the village is to continue to be the voice of my constituents in managing the village with a sense of fiscal responsibility and an eye toward smart growth.”
Of course, these election results were made possible by residents getting out and hitting the polls. We applaud everyone who made the effort to ensure that their voice was heard this election season, and we hope voter turnout will be even greater next time around.
Until then, farewell 2013 Consolidated Election season. Though our time together was brief, we absolutely enjoyed every second of it.

Letter: Thank you to the voters

I would like to thank the residents of Sugar Grove for giving me the opportunity to serve as village president for another four years.

I take great pride in representing the village and working with the residents, the Village Board and our staff to make Sugar Grove a great place to live.

With the election behind us, we can move forward to build an even better community. Thank you for the vote of confidence.

Sean Michels
Sugar Grove village president

Kaneland’s got talent

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The 12th Annual Kaneland Talent Show, was held Friday at the auditorium.
Dalvell Triplitt (above, left to right), Mike Karakourtis, Alex Carrillo and Chad Swieca danced to a mix of songs. Matt Vander Sande (right) of the band Atmospherica Iridescence performed “All Along the Watchtower.” Proceeds of the event went to the Kaneland High School Family and Consumer Science Department.
Photos by Patti Wilk

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Elburn plan commissioner wins seat on Village Board

by Susan O’Neill
ELBURN—Patricia Schuberg said that one of her major goals for the village, now that she has won a seat on the Elburn Village Board, is to get the word out about Elburn.

“I want people to know that it’s a viable and active community, and a good place for a business to put down roots,” she said.

Schuberg, one of four candidates vying for three seats on the Elburn Village Board, ended up receiving the most votes, according to unofficial results. Schuberg received 240 votes, Jeffrey Walter received 237, and Kenneth Anderson, Jr. landed 203. Walter and Anderson are incumbents who won their bids for re-election. Michael Rullman received 116 votes.

Trustee Jerry Schmidt did not seek re-election.

Schuberg has served on the Elburn Plan Commission for the past 15 years, including six years as its chair. She believes that her experience in government and business will help her to be an effective member of the Village Board from the beginning. She said she decided to run for a board seat at this time because Elburn is at a turning point in its development.

“There is a lull in our planning cycle, and policies and decisions are being made that will set the tone for years to come,” she said.

The biggest difference she would like to see four years from now when her term is completed is more balance between rooftops and business. Schuberg said there is an ordinance for an economic development commission on the books, and she will encourage Village President Dave Anderson to get that started again.

Schuberg would like to see future development that would not just cost the current residents more, but that would bring something of value to the village.

“Let’s get those open storefronts filled,” she said.

Schuberg said she would like to see all kinds of businesses, not just retail, but offices, commercial manufacturing and more.

“A healthy economic base has a wide diversity of businesses,” she said.

Schuberg, 53, has a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology and a Masters of Business Administration from Aurora University, with more than 20 years of experience in sales, marketing and consulting. She is currently an account manager with a textbook publisher for institutions of higher education.

She is also an active volunteer within the community. She began serving as a den leader when her two sons were in Cub Scouts, and continued on with scouting through Boy Scouts and Eagle Scouts. Among other commitments, Schuberg has also been actively involved in Elburn Baseball and Softball, and she is a member of the Town and Country Library Friends.

Schuberg said it is good to know that, with the election behind her, she can get down to work and serve. She will be sworn in on Monday, May 6.

Elburn residents may see water, sewer rate increase

Village considers adding a finance director
by Susan O’Neill
ELBURN—Residents may soon see an increase in their water and sewer rates if next year’s budget is approved. The increase was discussed at Monday’s Committee of the Whole meeting.

Based on average usage of 5,000 gallons of water a month, households will see their rates go from approximately $55 per month to $61 per month, for a total increase of $6 a month, or $72 a year, Public Works Superintendent John Nevenhoven said.

Infrastructure
According to Nevenhoven, about four years ago the village realized it was losing approximately $20,000 per month, due to the difference between what it cost to service residents and what the village was charging them.

In addition, Nevenhoven said that the village has put off capital improvement projects of the water and sewer systems for so long, that it’s necessary to make that investment now.

“We very much have an ancient system,” he said. “These funds will get us started.”

The big ticket items for this coming fiscal year include $130,000 for streets and storm sewer work, $120,000 for improvements in the water system and $115,000 for improvements to the sewer treatment system. In addition, $300,000 will be set aside for engineering and other start-up work for the waste-water treatment plant modernization project.

The village will review the rates each year. Nevenhoven recommended a 2 percent increase or one based on the Chicago area consumer price index, whichever is greater.

Personnel
Next year’s budget also calls for the addition of a finance director. The position, if approved, will be a salaried position, with an annual salary of $79,000 for a 32-hour work week, plus attendance at board meetings.

“We can afford it now,” he said. “This year will be the most expensive year. Next year, we’ll start to get some payback.”

According to Anderson, the village will no longer have the services of a financial consultant, a savings of $14,200, and a finance director would also take on the responsibilities of the village treasurer, for an additional savings of $5,000.

Village Administrator Erin Willrett said the finance director will be responsible for getting the village in good financial shape, including implementing capital asset and improvement programs.

The position will be appointed by Anderson and approved by the board.

“Let’s see how it works for a year,” Anderson said. “The person won’t be an employee; it will be a one-year appointment.”

Anderson also said that hiring a finance director will free up more of Willrett’s time to focus on economic development for the village.

The budget includes a 3 percent salary increase for village employees, and a 5 percent increase for the cost of medical benefits. The new medical plan begins in November, so the actual increase is unknown at this time.

Willrett, whose current annual salary is $99,744, will forego her 3 percent increase for the coming fiscal year.

Anderson corrected a statement he made at the previous Committee of the Whole meeting, in which he said he did not support hiring a full-time police officer. Anderson said he did not support hiring an additional full-time police officer, but he does support a full-time replacement position.

“My concern was in adding a police officer in addition to replacing the one that’s out on leave,” he said.

Trustee Jerry Schmidt still had concerns about the police budget.

“I haven’t slept much this last week,” he said on Monday. “I look at our police budget and our population. I just can’t vote for this with a clear conscience. I think we’re overstaffed for 5,000 people.”

Schmidt said he would rather see the money spent on improving the aesthetics of downtown Elburn.

“Go down to Plainfield—they’ve done a great job with their downtown,” he said. “I’d like to see some bricks and mortar at the end of the year.”

Trustee Bill Grabarek however said he did not know how to decrease the police force without putting the officers’ lives in jeopardy.

“The police are out there, putting their lives on the line,” he said. “You never know what you’re going to pull over.”

The fiscal year budget revenues are estimated at $4.5 million, not including the increases in the water and sewer rates. The expenditures are estimated at $4.8 million, which includes the finance director position and a replacement police officer position.

The budget will come before the board on Monday, April 15. The fiscal year will begin May 1.

Community Corner: The exciting 2013 Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival

by Maria Dripps-Paulson
Executive director, Kaneland Fine Arts Festival

The Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival (KCFAF) promises to be an amazing celebration of the arts, with more than 30 professional visual and performing artists showcased, as well as over 500 student art pieces displayed and an art auction of student and professional work.

On Sunday, April 21, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Kaneland High School will open its doors to over 3,000 guests who will experience the arts in the Kaneland School District’s hands-on, intergenerational and award-winning Fine Arts Festival event. This year’s roster of artists will delight the eye and feed the soul with their visual beauty and auditory splendor.

The 2013 Visual Artist Roster for the festival is an outstanding list of talented individuals.

Lars-Birger Sponberg immigrated to the United States in 1930, and his oil paintings hang in two U.S. embassies, as well as several galleries in the Midwest. Carol and Mark Pflughoeft travel to the festival from Iowa to present their work in acrylic and digital art. Local artist Sue Norris, brings her uniquely made pottery from Sugar Grove.

This year, with a grant from the Kaneland Foundation, the KCFAF was pleased to bring an artist into the schools throughout the district to partner with Kaneland art teachers and art students. The innaugural KCFAF Artist in Residence program is pleased to have Eric Nye, photographer and painter from Chicago, bring his creative 3D work to the festival.

KCFAF Artist in Residence art projects will be on display. Glass fusing and caricature drawing will again return as workshops for the festival.

New to this year’s list of workshops is silhouette artist Rachel Schwartz and author/illustrator Sallie Wolf. Schwartz will cut silhouettes of festival guests throughout the day, and Wolf will hold a writing workshop from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre.

Performing artists attending the festival will provide opportunities for all ages to experience

a variety of mediums. The Common Taters is a square dance band who will call dances beginning at 3:30 p.m. in the KHS commons.

Fans of the Chicago Cubs will want to attend the festival at 11 a.m. to hear the Chicago Cubs Dixieland Band delight audiences as they do at Cubs games. M & M Dance Company from Elburn will perform in the auditorium, as well as the Waubonsee Community College Steel Band and Bel Canto, the select choir from McDole Elementary.

Children who are not yet in school can experience Kaneland District Library Storytime at the festival, held at the top of every hour in the Pre-K Art Experience rooms of the Fox Valley Career Center.

The Sugar Grove Public Library will register library cards and check out books in the auditorium lobby. Student groups, such as the Art and Science Club, will provide facepainting, balloon artistry, and homemade instruments made from recycled material.

So much more makes up the festival day, and information can be found on www.kanelandartsfestival.org or www.facebook.com/kcfaf302.

Editor’s note
The above community-submitted column is one part of our broader mission to help our readers connect with their communities. If you or your organization would like to be part of our Community Corner initiative, please contact Editor Keith Beebe at kbeebe@elburnherald.com. Please note that no for-profit or elected officials are eligible to be part of the Community Corner.

Earning his wings

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An Eagle Scout Court of Honor for Nick Albano was held March 3 at the Congregational United Methodist Church of Christ in St. Charles. The event was hosted by Nick’s parents, Phillip and Sheila Albano of Elburn. Also in attendance were friends, family, BSA Elburn Troop 7 Scouts, Scoutmasters, Committee Members, Coach Chad Clarey (KHS Cross Country and Troop 7 Eagle Scout 1989), as well as representatives from the village of Elburn, the Elburn American Legion Post No. 630, the Fox Valley Marine Detachment No. 1223 and the church pastors. Photos by Patti Wilk

Firchau, Ream to wed

Bruce and Mary Sue Firchau of Elburn announce the engagement of their daughter, Lauren, to Adam Ream, son of Steve and Anita Ream of Hampshire, Ill.

The bride-to-be graduated from Kaneland High School in 2005, and later Monmouth College. She is employed at DeKalb High School.

The future groom graduate from Hampshire High School in 2001, and later Judson College. He is employed at Tom’s Farm Market and Greenhouse in Huntley, Ill.

The wedding will take place on Oct. 11, 2013, at St. Charles Borromeo Church in Hampshire.

Sugar Grove receives grant, fitness template

by Dave Woehrle
SUGAR GROVE—Sugar Grove Village Board members on Tuesday accepted a grant to install countdown timers at the intersection of Route 47 and Galena Boulevard.

The $4,500 grant was given by the Community Foundation of the Fox River Valley with the intention of overall pedestrian improvement. As part of the deal, the village must implement the Fit Kids 2020 Plan, a local effort by Kane County to reduce childhood obesity.

The village will generate quarterly reports concerning the health of local youth to the Kane County Health Department. These reports must include how the grant is affecting the target community, highlighting individual stories. The village must also provide pictures of events and participants engaged in healthy activities.

The grant covers activities until Dec. 15, 2013. Sharon Stredde, president and CEO of the Community Foundation of the Fox River Valley, signed off on the contract on Jan. 11.

Community Development Director Richard Young reviewed the proposal.

“We’re confident this is a good deal for the village,” Young said.

Letter: Comment regarding April 1 SG Township Board meeting

I attended the Sugar Grove Township meeting on April 1. Harry Davis was the acting supervisor since Dan Nagel was asked to resign. However, Harry appeared to be only a titular head, and (he) let Scott Jesseman be the mouthpiece.

The township spent over $12,000 on a special audit that the state’s attorney didn’t recommend pursuing charges. But the Township Board, in my opinion, is still on a witch hunt to smear Dan Nagel’s name.

Yes, Dan is a little bit of a bull in a china shop, and he is not a bookkeeper. But for 38 years, Dan’s heart has been dedicated to the township. When all the board members have given 38 years, then they would have a right to complain.

If the board were concerned as to the way bills were paid and the lack of receipts, then it, as a voting board, should have changed the rules and requirements for bill approval. But it didn’t; instead, Township Board members started a witch hunt and a smear campaign to get Dan to resign so they could run the township. Good luck on that—we will see what you can do in 38 years.

Scott Jessman called the audience “flying monkeys.” I feel that this was very unprofessional and a showing of his true colors. Is this a witch hunt, or are a bunch of boys and girls playing “King of the Mountain”? Power and politics are a sad combination; in my opinion, Sugar Grove Township is showing everyone what this combination looks like.

Karen M. McCannon (aka JoJo the Clown)
Sugar Grove