Tag Archives: Pat Bond

MP Village attorney: New committees operating legally

Trustees will vote on formal ordinance to establish them
by Martha Quetsch
Maple Park—New village committees that Maple Park President Kathy Curtis formed after being elected in April have been meeting even though the Village Board has not approved an ordinance formally creating the committees.

“The new committees have been working, as our legal counsel advised that we could,” Village President Kathy Curtis said.

The Village Board will vote on the official ordinance establishing the village’s three new committees at its next meeting, Tuesday, Aug. 4, Curtis said.

Curtis in May reduced the number of village committees from six to three, with the goal of streamlining work on village issues. The board planned to pass an ordinance July 7 changing the committees’ number, but because of an oversight by village officials, the ordinance was not prepared for the meeting, Curtis said.

Also during the July 7 meeting, trustee Terry Borg asked the village attorney, Pat Bond, whether the new committees could legally operate before the board approves the ordinance.

Bond said they could legally operate only if they were “special committees.” Since that meeting, a lawyer for Bond’s firm, Bond Dixon and Associates, informed Curtis in a letter July 9 that the three new committees arguably are special committees.

“Assuming the trustee members of the new committees were appointed by the Village President as provided in 1-5-6 of the Maple Park Village Code, the committees are arguably special committees and therefore could continue to function as such until the ordinance formally establishing them is adopted,” the lawyer, Keith Letsche said.

The new committees are Personnel and Communications; Finance, Public Relations and Development; and Infrastructure.

Among tasks that the new committees face includes finding and recommending a new police chief, which will be the work of the Personnel and Communications Committee: Curtis wants that to happen by Sept. 9.

The village previously had six committees: Finance, Streets, Water and Sewer, Parks and Grounds, Police and Planning.

In the letter to Curtis, Letsche also stated that any attempt to legally challenge the actions of the three new committees, on the grounds that the ordinance providing for them had not yet be adopted, would likely be unsuccessful. The reason is the creation of committees is not required or provided for by state statute, but is wholly discretionary, and committees do not take final actions on board or council matters, Letsch added.

New committees can’t start without ordinance

Document not ready for trustees’ vote as expected
by Martha Quetsch
MAPLE PARK—New village committees that Maple Park President Kathy Curtis formed after being elected in April cannot begin meeting until the Village Board approves an ordinance allowing for government structure change.

One of the new committees, Personnel and Communications, met June 22. During Tuesday’s Village Board meeting, trustee Terry Borg asked the village attorney, Pat Bond, whether the new committees could legally operate before the board approves the ordinance.

“No, unless you establish them as special committees,” Bond said.

Curtis in May reduced the number of village committees from six to three, with the goal of streamlining work on village issues. The board planned to pass an ordinance July 7 changing the committees’ number, but because of an oversight by village officials, the ordinance was not prepared for Tuesday’s meeting, Curtis said.

The village is expected to prepare the ordinance for trustees to vote on at their next board meeting, Tuesday, July 22.

The new committees will be Personnel and Communications; Finance, Public Relations and Development; and Infrastructure.

Under village ordinance, the village may have six committees: Finance, Streets, Water and Sewer, Parks and Grounds, Police and Planning. In place for the past several years, they have not functioned since Curtis announced their disbandment.

Among tasks that the new committees face includes finding and recommending a new police chief, which will be the work of the Personnel and Communications Committee: Curtis wants that to happen by Sept. 9.

Proposed Maple Park Committees
• Personnel and Communications
• Finance
• Public Relations and Development
• Infrastructure

Scoping out sink holes in Heritage Hills

by Lynn meredith
The Maple Park Village Board voted to take a closer look at an 18-inch pot hole at the intersection of Chester and Fabia in the Heritage Hills subdivision. Public Works Director Eric Pinion expressed concern that the leaking storm drains might cause the street to cave in if repairs are not made.

“It’s a very expensive project, but it’s got to be done this summer, or we’re going to start losing our streets,” Pinion said.

The problem is that the original design called for a rectangular top to sit on a round concrete structure creating gaps where it sticks out on the sides. According to Village Engineer Ralph Tompkins, if the gaps are not properly sealed, the frost brings it up and eventually the mortar begins to fall out. If dirt, rather than gravel, is used to back-fill, it will settle and create hollow spots under the street.

“We’re talking about a design problem. It’s not unique to Maple Park,” Village Attorney Pat Bond said. “If it was built according to the specifications at the time, then there’s not much you can do.”

The problem is common and often shows up 10 years after a subdivision is built, Tompkins said.

The village approved the use of a scoping camera to see the extent of the problem.

“Due to the emergency nature of the pot holes, I move we hire Elliot Wood to dig up and televise both the storm sewer and the sewer line to make sure there’s no significant damage, based on our engineers looking at the viewing, and to go ahead and complete the repair at the intersection of Chester and Fadia,” Chairman of the Streets Committee Mark Delaney said.

Village adjusts police referendum

by Lynn Meredith

The Maple Park Village Board amended the proposition it approved in December to place a referendum for police services on the April ballot so that it would yield the dollars necessary to operate the department.

In December, the board voted to raise the tax levy limitation from .51 to .56. However, Village Attorney Pat Bond reported that the increase would not yield the amount needed to operate the Police Department.

He suggested the board increase the tax rate from .35 to .40. Raising both the levy limitation and the tax rate will yield an additional $16,000 to $20,000 for the village.

A levy is the amount the village requests in order to satisfy its budget expenditures. It levies taxes to accommodate those obligations.

A rate is the amount that will be collected. It represents the amount assessed on each property. These rates yield a certain number of dollars the village gets back from the County Clerk.

If the referendum passes, the owner of a $100,000 house would see an increase in taxes of approximately $16.