Tag Archives: Walgreens

Walgreens seeks license to sell beer and wine

by Martha Quetsch
ELBURN—Walgreens officials have asked the village to grant the Elburn store a liquor license for beer and wine to appeal to “one-stop shoppers,” pharmacy officials said.

“Our customers want to be able to pick up a bottle of wine for dinner or a six-pack for a Saturday afternoon,” Walgreens district manager Mike Tomic told the Elburn Development Committee on Monday.

The Village Board will decide whether to create a new, available license. If the board establishes the new license, Liqour Commssioner Dave Anderson, who also is Village President. will determine whether to grant the license to Walgreens.

Walgreens will shelve its liquor in a 12-foot, existing aisle and cooler section, which would be locked during the village’s non-liquor-sale hours, Tomic said.

Walgreens opened five months ago on the north side of Route 38 at Route 47 in Elburn. On the opposite corner, Jewel-Osco has sold liquor since it opened in 2007.

All Walgreens employees receive liquor-sales instruction as part of their corporate training, Tomic said.

Sugar Grove village notes

by Susan O’Neill

Board adopts 2009 zoning map
The Village Board adopted a 2009 zoning map that includes several revisions approved in 2008, including the Prairie Grove Commons annexation and rezoning, the Nickels property rezoning, the Hannaford Farm PUD amendment, Dr. Craig Zabel’s Main Street property rezoning and special use, and the township’s property rezoning and special use on Main Street.

The map does not change any of the current zoning districts. The adoption of a new zoning map each year is required by state statute.

Board approves LED signage ordinance
The Village Board on Tuesday approved an amendment to the village sign code that would allow for electronic message display (LED) signs, which the current code does not allow. The amendment includes standards for color, design, sign display area and setbacks, and prohibits rotating, flashing, blinking or scrolling effects.

The new Sugar Grove Library building ground sign and the sign for the new Walgreens will comply with the standards in the amendment, as well as future commercial buildings.

Work on water main continues
Village Board members approved a sixth grant of easement for the Route 47 and Wheeler Road water main improvement to service Kaneland Harter Middle School. The easement grants permanent and construction easements to the village to construct, install and maintain the water main.

Board establishes backup SSA for The Landings
The board on Tuesday approved an ordinance establishing a backup Special Service Area (SSA) for The Landings development located west of Route 47 and south of Park Avenue.

The ordinance allows the village to authorize maintenance, repair and replacement of storm water systems, landscaping, private roads, parking areas and signage, and to establish a mosquito abatement program.

The ordinance allows the village to levy an annual tax if the association fails to conduct the maintenance.

Making ‘A to B’ easier

by Susan O’Neill
Next to a land-use plan, a transportation plan for a community or a region may be the most important to establish for a growing area. By developing a transportation plan in conjunction with one for future residential and commercial development, government officials can ensure there are adequate roads to accommodate the increased traffic.

By working with other entities such as developers, the state, county or federal government, and having a plan in place when the money becomes available, a municipality can exercise some control over the necessary road improvements.

Planning ahead for road maintenance precludes the need for more expensive repair down the road. Funding plays a major role in the ability of a village, township or county to accomplish this, as well.

Elburn
The most significant recent transportation development in the Elburn area has been the extension of the Metra train line west to the village. With an average of 250 to 300 cars per day in the parking lot, the station has exceeded everyone’s expectations, Elburn Village President Jim Willey said.

Elburn Village Administrator Dave Morrison said Metra has requested federal funds to assist with an expansion of the parking lot to accommodate at least another 300 cars. This project should take place in 2009 or 2010.

Willey said the village is actively working with Sho-Deen developers on plans to build around the train station. The biggest hurdle is funding for the expansion of Elburn’s wastewater treatment plant to accommodate the growth.

Willey said it was good to have commercial projects in place at the intersection of Routes 47 and 38 when the recession hit. With Walgreens going up on the northeast corner, there is additional significant business rental opportunity within the Prairie Valley North commercial development where Walgreens is located.

He said the state has plans for a pedestrian signal at the intersection to allow for safe crossing across Route 38 from McDonald’s to the new development. Development of the northwest corner will happen more slowly.

According to Willey, Kane County reports that the exponential increase in traffic counts on Route 47 has begun to level out with the slow-down of the economy. Construction of the Anderson Street overpass, still a county priority, should serve as a functional bypass for local and regional traffic, mitigating some of the excess on Route 47.

Grobmar Investments, LLC, has plans for a multi-tenant retail development at the northwest corner of Keslinger and Route 47, Morrison said. According to Willey, Elburn is working with the Kane County Department of Transportation (KDOT) and the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) for future road improvements in that area.

“However, the cemetery will always be an issue for that corner,” Willey said. “It’s not going anywhere.”

He said there are no solid proposals for the southwest and southeast corners of the intersection.

“A full interchange at I-88 and Route 47 would really benefit Elburn,” Willey said. “Residents have to take a circuitous route to go east on 88.”

Sugar Grove
Sugar Grove is currently extending Municipal Drive north of Route 30 and extending Galena Boulevard west to meet it. Village President Sean Michels said he feels these extensions are important for future commercial and business park development in Sugar Grove. The Municipal Drive extension has proved useful in enticing HondaJet to locate its Midwest operations at the Aurora Municipal Airport.

The village added its own financing to $4 million in funding obtained from the federal government to accomplish these projects.

The roads will provide access for 150 acres of retail development on the southwest side of Route 47 and Galena Boulevard. Plans for extending Municipal Drive farther north to Wheeler Road will facilitate commercial development at the as-yet-undeveloped 180-acre business park, High Pointe Center.

A feasibility study for a full intersection at Interstate 88 and Route 47 is currently under way with funding from the Crown Community Development, the village of Sugar Grove and other property owners in the area. Several years ago, Crown Development proposed a 790-acre mixed-use development around the intersection of Route 47 and Interstate 88 that would benefit from a full interchange there.

Michels said identifying future funding sources such as the Illinois Tollway Highway Authority, developers and IDOT, will be necessary to move the project forward.

Road improvements are scheduled for this spring at Bliss and Merrill roads to make the intersection safer. Blind spots on the road have become more hazardous, as development in the area has led to an increase in traffic. The funding will come from fees collected through Kane County’s recently implemented transportation impact fees.

Michels said the construction of bridges over the Burlington Railroad tracks at Gordon Road and Municipal Drive south of Route 30 would provide alternate routes to Route 47, relieving some of the traffic along the road in that area. The village currently does not have a funding source to accomplish these projects.

Sugar Grove will use more than $1 million of Local Agency Pavement Preservation (LAPP) money for two major overlays at Wheeler and Norris roads. The village will pay $300,000 toward the project, using road impact fees collected from developers. Michels said the village has been able to regularly provide maintenance on village roads and reviews its maintenance plans on a continual basis.

Michels said he thinks the Prairie Parkway will provide an economic benefit to the village, with the Route 30 interchange allowing for easy access.

“Transportation is key to our economic future and our quality of life,” Michels said.

Maple Park
Maple Park recently conducted a transportation study to determine what roads and road improvements were needed to handle increased traffic associated with new residential development. Although development of the John Claire Homes and Grand Pointe Homes projects are both currently on hold, trustee Terry Borg said that once the economy bounces back, progress on these projects and the road improvements will resume.

Two years ago, the village resurfaced selected roads in the old part of the town. With emergency funding, the village built up Main, Elm and Willow streets using crushed rock. With the help of a Kane County Community Development Block Grant, the village rebuilt several sidewalks on the south side of town.

Kaneville
Village President Bob Rodney said Kaneville does not have any road projects planned within the village in the near future. Kaneville Township Road Commissioner Denny Long said the township and village blacktopped most of the roads in the area a few years ago, so they are in fairly good shape.

“We haven’t got the money to consider any improvements for now,” Rodney said.

Regional
IDOT engineer Rick Powell said he is hopeful that the study to widen Route 47 between Yorkville and Sugar Grove will take place this year. This is in addition to the stretch of Route 47 from Interstate 80 to Caton Farm Road that will be widened to four lanes as a part of the Prairie Parkway project.

The Prairie Parkway project, a 35-mile north-south highway to connect Interstate 80 to Interstate 88, received federal approval in September 2008 after a process that lasted seven years.

IDOT is currently purchasing land in the corridor where the road will be built. Powell said 2,600 acres will be needed for the highway, as well as to widen the 12 miles of Route 47 from Caton Farm Road to I-80. As of January 2009, IDOT acquired approximately 250 acres of the land needed.

Construction could begin on the road as early as 2010. The first stretch of road that will be built is the 11 miles between routes 71 and 34, with the next priority between routes 34 and 30.

IDOT has $16 million for the Prairie Parkway project in the highway program budget for 2009, with $72 million set aside for 2010-14.

“We keep receiving money to keep moving forward,” Powell said.

Photo: With a parking lot full of cars, the Elburn Metra station is one of the most significant additions to area transportation in recent years. File Photo

Perspectives on growth

by Lynn Meredith
One thing people can agree on is that growth, for the time being, has slowed significantly. The economy, housing market and credit crunch have all contributed to reducing the number of homes and businesses that are coming into the Kaneland area. However, each of the four Kaneland towns has a different perspective on growth for their village.

Sugar Grove
There was a time when the village of Sugar Grove issued 200 building permits in one year. In 2008, it issued 24 permits. In the past, the village saw a rise in single-family homes, with several subdivisions being developed.

“Growth wasn’t as hot and heavy as in other suburbs,” Community Development Director Rich Young said. “ But for our relative size, we saw a lot of growth.”

One large subdivision, Settler’s Ridge, finished 117 homes with 100 lots ready to be built on and land ready to be developed. With the reversal in the economy and housing market, houses are not being built at nearly the same rate.

“Growth has fallen off significantly,” Young said. “They predict that 2009 will not be much better than 2008.”

Although three developments are still active, two that were approved but never annexed have either decided not to go forward or declared bankruptcy.

Young said that Sugar Grove has seen some activity in commercial building, with builders showing interest in future development. Still, office and commercial buildings sit empty.
The village is working with local commercial brokers to promote the village both regionally and nationally.

“We’re trying to be proactive on a limited budget,” Young said. “We should see growth ramp back up slowly and hope by the end of the calendar year of 2010 to see it start to return.”

Maple Park
For a village of 750 people, the influx of a possible 3,000 homes in two major subdivisions would change the small town of Maple Park. The village set in motion plans to improve the town well, and build a new water tower and wastewater treatment plant with the money it would receive from the developers.

In addition, the village approved two strip malls on the southwestern and northeastern corners of the intersection of Route 38 and County Line Road.

All that has come to a halt.

“With no impact fees, we’re left hanging,” said village Financial Committee Chairman Kathy Curtis. “We’re running the town on taxpayers’ money.”
For now, the village plans to paint the old water tower and apply for grants to help the aging infrastructure.

As the economy improves, so will bond prices. When that happens, Curtis said, it will be one year for developers to be able to make the improvements the town has counted on.
“It will take 10 years for us to build out,” Curtis said. “We’ll still be a small town for the next 20 years.”

Elburn
In the last five years, Elburn has seen several new commercial-manufacturing buildings and new commercial and industrial businesses. The surprising twist is that most of the new businesses came to town in 2008.

Community Development Director Erin Willrett lists 14 new businesses in 2008, including Walgreen’s, Fox Valley Driving School, Green Light Driving School, Boyce Body Werks, Munchie P’s and Good Call Plumbing Services.

In past years, there were not nearly as many new businesses. In 2003, two new businesses started in Elburn. In 2004, three businesses, Curves, Genoa Pizza and American Bank and Trust opened.

In 2005, five new businesses started, and in 2006, two, Elburn Auto Repair and Jewel, came to town. Five businesses opened in 2007, and by 2008, there were a total of 28 commercial and industrial businesses that had started in the previous five years.

Currently within the village, there are five industrial parks and one potential park for the future. In Keystone Industrial Park, 48 lots exist, and nine are vacant. In Welch Creek Business Park, 10 buildable lots exist with three vacancies.

Kaneville
Kaneville has a plan in place for growth in the village. It’s called the 2030 plan, and calls for not just growth for growth’s sake, but for smart growth. Its Planning Commission is working with Kane County to see what that means.

“We want smart growth,” village trustee and owner of Hill’s Country Store Pat Hill said. “We want a few businesses and a few houses.”

Hill said that a subdivision on Dauberman Road had been dug in, ready for roads to be put in, but now nothing is going on. Ten lots had been sold out of a possible 40, but now only two have been sold. The other buyers either got their money back or lost it.

With acres and acres of prime black-dirt farmland around, Hill said she finds it a shame to build on the best farm land or on wetlands. She enjoys the thrill of farmers bringing in the Indian arrowheads they have found while working up the land.

Photo: Kevin Cook’s Elburn Pack and Ship was just one of the new businesses to come to Elburn in the last year. Photo by Sarah Rivers

Village approves agreement for Prairie Grove Commons

by Susan O’Neill
The Village Board approved an annexation agreement for the 44-acre Prairie Grove Commons commercial development on Tuesday, a center on the west side of Route 47 and Galena Boulevard extended, where the Walgreens is expected to open a store.

Village officials also approved the final plan for the Walgreens store, even though the company has delayed its construction to 2012.

The village’s hope is to attract big box stores to the property south of Galena Boulevard; to that end, the annexation agreement includes a sales tax rebate for the property from Galena Boulevard south to Route 30.

“It’s a win-win for everyone,” said attorney James White, who represents the developers.

He explained that the agreement gives the developers an incentive with which to attract retailers to a “green” area, one in which little development currently exists. In addition, the village receives a share of the sales tax, and the School District receives its share of the property taxes.

The term for the rebate agreement is 14 years. The clock starts ticking either two years from the signing of the annexation agreement or when the first occupancy permit is issued, whichever comes first.

The amount the retailers receive back is higher (1.25 percent of sales) for the first four years, to offset the costs of infrastructure associated with the development. The percentage is reduced for the remaining 10 years, with the village receiving 1 percent and the retailers receiving the other 1 percent.

When the 14 years are up, the village receives the full 2 percent of sales in taxes. The Walgreens store is not included in the sales tax rebate agreement.

The Walgreens store and drive-through pharmacy will be located at the northwest corner of Route 47 and Galena Boulevard.

Walgreens delays construction in SG

by Susan O’Neill

The Walgreen Company will delay building in Sugar Grove until 2012.

Until a couple of weeks ago, Sugar Grove officials had been told Walgreens would break ground for a drug store on a 2-acre site at the northwest corner of Route 47 and the Galena Boulevard extension, with plans to open by year’s end.

However, Sugar Grove Community Development Director Rich Young said Walgreens representatives said they are taking a step backward and waiting for the economy to pick up before building in Sugar Grove.

“We’re told it does fit their business model,” Village President Sean Michels said. “We’re disappointed they’re not going to open it sooner.”

At the end of last year, the Village Board reviewed the Walgreens’ plan, as well as plans for the first phase of the 44-acre Prairie Grove Commons development, in which the store would be located. The first phase covers the portion of the property south of The Landings and north of Galena Boulevard extended, on the west side of Route 47.

Michels said the Village Board still plans to approve the annexation agreement with Prairie Grove Commons developers at the next regularly scheduled board meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 3. The agreement will include approval of the preliminary and final plat of the Walgreens site and a rezoning of the entire property for a commercial Planned Unit Development (PUD).

The developers would have to come back before the board for approval on plans for the remaining lots, those north of Galena Boulevard and west of where the Walgreens will be, as well as those south of Galena to Route 30.

Michels said the developers hope to attract some big box stores, such as Kohl’s, as well as others to the development. They had hoped that the presence of a Walgreens would be a factor in encouraging the others to come.

Although the annexation agreement does not include an economic incentive for Walgreens, the village has worked out the details of an incentive plan to attract some of the larger users. He said the incentive will be in the form of a sales tax rebate to offset some of the developer’s costs for roadway and other improvements.

Michels said the time clock for the incentive package begins running once the annexation agreement is signed. Young said the timeframe for the agreement, which gives the developers a certain percentage of sales tax receipts each year, is for a term of 14 years. He said the agreement is set up to encourage development sooner.

The Walgreen Company, which announced a new chief executive officer on Monday, unveiled a strategy in October 2008 to increase its overall performance, including slowing future store openings to focus on leveraging its more than 6,600 existing stores across the country and Puerto Rico.

According to its website, the company, which remains committed to convenient shopping for its customers through locating stores within five miles of two-thirds of all Americans, is also committed to decreasing its capital spending by $1 billion over the next three years.

“We’re still hopeful that they’ll come sooner than 2012,” Young said. “That’s what we’ve been told for now.”

Working hard

Despite construction slowdown, building department remains busy

by Susan O’Neill

The Building and Zoning Department issued 255 permits for 2008, down from 366 for 2007. Although new construction was down from last year, Building Commissioner Jim Stran said his department was kept busy with permits for improvements and other tasks.

Elburn welcomed 13 new businesses during 2008, with the most recent certificate of occupancy issued for Boyce Body Werks in December. Walgreens is expected to open in April 2009.

Stran reviewed his department’s activities for 2008 at Monday’s Committee of the Whole meeting. In addition to building and construction, several activities were in response to weather events, such as assisting with pumping and water removal and surveying sanitary and storm sewers during September’s flood, and contributing 32 hours to the snow removal efforts in the month of December.

His department also assembled and installed a park bench and picnic table in Byerhoff Park and installed an additional bike rack at the Metra Station.

Village Board members expressed their appreciation for his department helping out with work outside their job description, especially for the Public Works Department.

Elburn deals with economic downturn

Finances in forefront in 2008

by Martha Quetsch

            The community of Elburn showed confidence on some fronts and restraint on others in 2008, reflecting optimism as well as uncertainty about the economy.
 
Smoking ban effect evident
            A new state law prohibiting smoking in businesses started Jan. 1, leaving some local restaurant and tavern owners wondering what effect it would have on them.

            For Blackberry Inn in Elburn, the smoking ban led to more food sales and less bar business this year.

            “We have had a lot of new customers who wanted to try our food for a long time but didn’t come in before because we were a smoking establishment,” manager Dawn Faber said. “But when the kitchen closes, it’s dead.”
 
Village, county officials make choices
            Also in January, Elburn trustees hired Erin Willrett as the village’s first community development director, for an annual salary of $73,000.

            “Ms. Willrett will work with developers, business owners and stakeholders to assist in implementing the Village Board’s policies on carefully managed growth,” Village Administrator David Morrison said at the time of the hiring.

            Meantime, the health of the economy was declining, with housing starts dropping, meaning less revenue for Elburn from utilities connection and building fees.

            Nevertheless, in July, the Elburn Village Board approved 4.1-percent pay raises for all village employees and even more for some staff. However, trustees Patricia Romke and Gordon Dierschow voted against the pay hikes because they were more than those received by average people in the private sector this year.

            Citing the same reason, local resident Drew Frasz, right after being appointed to the Kane County Board, voted against a similar pay raise for county employees. Frasz won in the Republican primary against incumbent Jan Carlson, who stepped down after his defeat, leaving his position open. The board appointed Frasz to fill the District 14 position in May.
 
Recreation spending decisions made
            Using money from its limited recreation fund, the Village built a new tot lot at 215 W. Shannon St. this summer, naming it after after former village police chief and longtime local public servant Wayne Byerhof. The village purchased the Byerhof Park site, formerly a residential lot, two years ago for $165,000. The village spent more than $50,000 on site preparation and playground equipment for the tot lot, the first park on the northwest side of the Elburn.

            During October, the Village Board also tabled a proposal for a skateboard park in Elburn because of its more than $100,000 cost. Trustees said the remaining money in the recreation fund could cover the cost, but the village might need it for other purposes because of expected financial constraints.
 
Business changes occur
            Bucking the belt-tightening trend, Party Animals expanded its business in downtown Elburn, moving in October to a larger location a couple of doors down to the former Gliddon’s Drug Store location at 116 B. Main St. There, Party Animals offers its children’s celebrations and a new coffee shop.

            The downtown lost two businesses this year, Sears and Emma’s Pub and Cantina. Emma’s gave up its liquor license in May after the Police Department cited the restaurant for illegal gambling. The Sears appliance store at 107 N. Main St., Elburn, closed in October after less than two years in business.

            Four months earlier, a longtime Elburn business changed hands. Ehlers Lawn & Recreation sold its 51-year-old family business to another John Deere dealer, Hogan Walker.

            Despite the economic downturn, Walgreens continued with its plan to build on the northeast corner of Route 38 and Route 47. The store is expected to open this spring.

            Likewise, two planned developments pushed forward, Keslinger Plaza and Elburn Station. Village officials in September approved design plans for the first phase of Keslinger Plaza, a commercial development whose site is at Keslinger Road and Route 47. Elburn Station, a Sho-Deen Inc. development, received Village Board approval of its concept plan in July.

Whistle ban measure approved
            In April, village trustees agreed to pursue the least costly method to silence train whistles in the village in compliance with federal safety regulations. They decided installing wayside horns at the First Street and Route 47 rail crossings were the solution. The wayside horns will cost an estimated $100,000 per crossing, compared to $400,000 for a previous proposal—to install a center barrier of pylons at the First Street crossing, village engineers said.

            “It won’t be a quiet zone, but it will be a better situation than we have now,” village trustee Craig Swan said.
 
When it rains, it pours
            More economic uncertainty faced the village after unusually heavy rains in September led to sewer system backups in the village. The village is conducting a study of residential sewer systems to determine the cause and potential cost of resolving the situation. 

            The village’s new public works superintendent, John Nevenhoven, will be among village staff members working on the study. Village trustees hired Nevenhoven in September to replace Art Sanchez, whom they asked to retire four months earlier, saying they needed someone more experienced in the position. Nevenhoven was assistant village manager in Huntley from 2004 to 2005. The village is paying Nevenhoven $78,500, compared to Sanchez’ $88,993 final salary.
 
Hold-ups hit home
            Citing possible financial hardship on the part of the robbers, FBI statistics show that recently, bank hold-ups have risen significantly. An Elburn heist was among several area bank robberies this year in towns including Union, Huntley and Campton Hills.

            Thanks to the FBI, the village of Elburn did not have to bear the entire cost and burden of investigating the bank robbery that happened March 25 at Fifth Third Bank. Elburn police and the FBI are continuing to cooperate in trying to apprehend the “Backpack Bandit.”

            “We are just still waiting for some lab reports. The case is still under investigation,” Elburn Police Chief Jim Linane said Monday. “We’re still making progress, but it’s slow.”

Growth shifts from homes to stores

by Susan O’Neill

            With a struggling economy in the background, the village of Sugar Grove saw a shift of focus in 2008. In previous years much effort was spent planning for residential growth, but this year it was spent on bringing commercial projects into the village.
 
Sugar Grove is recognized
            Sugar Grove began the new year by celebrating BusinessWeek.com‘s choice of the village as the best affordable suburb in Illinois. Sugar Grove was picked as a relatively affordable community that offers the lowest crime rate, finest schools and the best quality of life for the money in the state.

            Sugar Grove learned in June that Standard & Poors upgraded the village’s bond rating from an A to an A+.

            Settler’s Ridge, Sugar Grove’s conservation development, earned a Conservation and Native Landscaping Award from the Chicago Wilderness Corporation Council and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its landscaping and innovative water works systems. The water works system also received the Project of the Year Award from the American Public Works Association Chicago Metro Chapter.
 
The economy and growth
            The Settler’s Ridge Subdivision was dealt a blow in April when developer Kimball Hill Homes requested bankruptcy protection. The development, which was to include 2,678 homes, was put up for sale after only 100 residences were built. Kimball Hill announced it would go out of business at year’s end.

            New home starts dropped significantly, leading the village to renegotiate annexation agreements with developers of projects in progress.

            Although residential development lagged in Sugar Grove in 2008, commercial development continued to move forward.

            “It’s been a busy year,” Village President Sean Michels said. “There has been $65 million in investment in the village.”

            Multiple commercial/office developments either opened or expanded, and many new businesses opened, ranging from two new preschools to a family practice physician and other retail outlets, locations like The Landings, Sugar Grove Center and the Capital Professional Center saw growth throughout the year.
 
Municipal development
            Groundbreaking for the new Sugar Grove Public Library building took place on May 3, although voters rejected a measure to increase the tax rate to increase the library’s operating expenses.

            The Sugar Grove Fire District moved nine firefighters to the Oswego Fire District station on Galena Road in July to meet response time standards in the area from the station on Route 30 and Municipal Drive.
 
Airport growth
            Growth is taking place at the Aurora Municipal Airport in Sugar Grove as well, with two companies opening new locations: one in December and another slated for 2009.
 
New church in village

            The Rockford Diocese created the first new Roman Catholic parish in almost 20 years in Sugar Grove this year. The St. Katharine Drexel parish holds weekend masses at the Kaneland John Shields Elementary School until a church can be built on land donated by the Jerry Rich family. The parish priest, Fr. Robert Jones, began in time to conduct Advent services on Nov. 29.

            What began several years ago as a plan to build a new separate village hall and police facility based on population projections of 60,000 plus was ultimately reduced at year’s end to the reconfiguration of the Police Department reception area for increased protection and safety of police personnel.
 
Infrastructure
            Construction also began this year on the Municipal Drive and Galena Boulevard extension, and plans moved forward for the extension of the village’s water main out to the Kaneland Harter Road Middle School.
 
SG joins county program
            The Sugar Grove Village Board approved a measure to join Ride in Kane, a county-wide program to provide transportation to eligible residents in need. With participation by the Sugar Grove Township, Park District and Public Library, the village will receive $4,000 from the Regional Transportation Authority. Services will begin July 1, 2009.
 
Future growth
            Robert Arthur Land Company in October brought plans for an active adult community to the Village Board for its feedback. The 190-acre development would include a mix of single-family homes for active adults and rental apartments and condominiums targeting adults over 55 on land originally set aside for the Settler’s Ridge development.

            Village officials reviewed plans in November for a Walgreens store scheduled to open in 2009 at the northwest corner of Route 47 and the Galena Boulevard extension. Attorney James White said the developer, the Daly Group, LLC, hopes to attract some big-box stores to the development.

            Michels said there are a couple of other smaller retailers, including an auto service center and a small hardware store that the village is talking to for possible location in the Prairie Grove Commons, south of Galena Boulevard and west of Route 47.

            The village hopes to take advantage of potential infrastructure funding that may be available in 2009 through the new federal administration’s stimulus package. Village staff submitted two infrastructure projects to the Metropolitan Mayor’s Caucus for the Harter Road water main extension and the Municipal Drive extension from Galena Boulevard to Wheeler Road.

            Michels said the village is still working on a full interchange at I-88 and Route 47. There is currently a feasibility study underway for the interchange and that is going well, he said.

            According to Michels, when the construction market begins to pick up again, Sugar Grove should be in a good position to take advantage of it with the essential infrastructure in place.